question marksWhether you are a seasoned AI teacher or ready to explore the world of #artsint, chances are you know a few of these basics, but it’s always a good idea to check in on yourself every so often.

Here’s a quick quiz to make sure you’re on the right track!

Question ONE:

True or False?   If you already teach an art form, you can’t really write or implement an arts integrated lesson plan.

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The correct answer is ‘False’. Any arts teacher can use arts integration by integrating a different art form into what their particular art content is.   For example, if you teach visual arts, consider integrating music standards into your classroom. If you are a music teacher, integrate drama. Some of the best learning experiences happen when students are melting art forms together. The level of their learning explodes as they are igniting so many parts of their brains.

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Question TWO:

The following are great reasons to use arts integration. You may select one or more:

a. It takes extra time up in the day.

b. It could give me a chance to collaborate with other teachers.

c. It motivates students.

d. It could play to students’ talents and interests.

e. It helps students develop a deeper understanding of the content you are teaching.

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Use these correct answers to help advocate for using more and more arts integration: B. It could give me a chance to collaborate with other teachers., C. It motivates students,, D. It could play to students’ talents and interests., E. It helps students develop a deeper understanding of the content you are teaching.

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Question THREE:

True or False? Assessments should mirror the content and art standard you have.

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The correct answer is ‘True’. You want to directly assess the all the standards you are teaching.  In other words check out the standards of the art form you want to address and then use the wording of that standard to help you create your assessment.
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Question FOUR:

True or False? It is important to assess the art form standard as well as any other content area standards.

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The correct answer is ‘True’. To be true arts integration, you must work to not only teach an art standard, but assess it.  That is what will make what you are doing TRUE arts integration!

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Question FIVE:

The following are great ideas for assessment.  Select one or more:

a. Checklist

b. Exit Ticket

c. Observations/Anecdotal Notes

d. 3-2-1

e. Rubric

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All answers are correct on this one! Assessments come in a variety of forms and sizes. They can be quick or highly involved. You need to pick the right assessment for what you and your students need.

a. Checklist Use a checklist to assess if a student completes an aspect of the assignment.  For example, using a variety of 3 or more types of media.

b. Exit tickets are a great was to quickly assess a student’s general or specific understanding.  For example, ask “What is the most important thing you learned about how music relates to fractions?” or “What 3 levels of dance are there? Which ones did you use in your dance to interpret the growth of a seed?”

c. Observations/Anecdotal Notes are a great way to take notes on what students are doing and how they are interacting with an art form.  Noticing their comfort level, for example can be something you look at at various times throughout the year.  Notes can also be made about a student’s participation and attitude throughout the creative process. These types of comments can also be used as a way to give meaningful feedback to your students.

d.  3-2-1 can be used to gather formative information after or before a lesson.  For example, 3 things you learned, 2 things that surprised you and 1 question you have.

e. Rubrics are good to use when you want to put a student’s range of use or understanding in a quantifiable measure.

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Question SIX:

True or False? Collaboration is a MUST when it comes to arts integration.

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The correct answer is ‘False’. Collaboration can be a wonderful way to plan and teach an arts integrated lesson, but it’s not a must.  Individual teachers are absolutely capable of teaching two sets of standards and assessing both.  The key is to start with art forms that you are more comfortable with and then you can branch out.

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Question SEVEN:

These are ways I can work towards collaboration. Select one or more:

a. I can collaborate with another arts teacher in my building.

b. I can collaborate with someone outside of education.

c. I can collaborate with a like-minded teacher from another school.

d. I can collaborate with another non arts teacher in my building.

e. I can collaborate with a local artist.

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These are actually ALL great ways to collaborate!

a. I can collaborate with another arts teacher in my building.

These teachers are your best resource.  Not only because they are skilled artists, but because they already know some of the skills your students have in an art form.  In other words, you could build off of what they already know work to develop those skills.  Remember arts integration is not a stand alone, but should build off of what students are learning in their arts classes.  Working with the art, music, movement (PE), theater, etc teacher is a great place to start.

b. I can collaborate with someone outside of education.

Why not?  If you have a person who has knowledge in another art form and is willing to collaborate with you on an arts integrated lesson, go for it!

c. I can collaborate with a like-minded teacher from another school.

This type of collaboration can be fun because there are opportunities for students to share their work with others from a completely different school.  How exciting!

d. I can collaborate with another non arts teacher in my building.

Everyone has a talent.  Maybe there’s another teacher in your building who has an artistic talent they’d be willing to share.  OR  Maybe another teacher is willing to give go out on a limb and try something arts integrated with you!

e. I can collaborate with a local artist.

Local artists are an amazing and often, overlooked resource for arts integration.  Consider looking for one in your community that would be willing to come in.  Just keep in mind that their time working in the arts is their job and they should be compensated.  This is where you may look into writing a grant, if necessary or going to you PTA/PTO for financial assistance.
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Well, how did you do? Share an idea or two in the comments and let us know what great things you are doing with your students!

For more information about creating arts integrated lessons, check out these resources as well:

True Arts Integration

Arts ED vs Arts INT

4 Steps to Creating an Arts Integrated Lesson

Working with Arts Standards for Arts Integration

Arts Integration for the Arts Teacher

How to Use Role-Playing Games to Teach English: Practical Tips
Practice What We Preach

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